Sunday, September 5, 2010

first, make sure the ramp is clear

  • then go back to the boat and grab the three pieces of trailering gear - the red bungee wrapped around the JW pennant (so it doesn't flap around while trailering on the highway and get worn out), the yellow cambuckle tie down strap that holds the hull on the trailer and the orange flag tied on the transom and put them in the passenger side front seat
  • uncleat the dockline that supports both the main mast and mizzen mast on the dummy mast that raises them off the deck as they lie horizontal for trailering
  • remove the shoe (a small box that stops them from sliding around) at the base of the two masts, sitting next to the transom, raise the mizzen mast and set it in place
at the ramp
  • get the boomkin, tiller, rudder out of the cockpit sole in the aft cockpit, and the mizzen boom (with sail tied on) inside the cockpit on the starboard side, and lean them all up against the coaming
  • hop out of the boat, put the rudder in place, slide the tiller into the rudder stock and tie off the pennant to the cleat and cam cleat mounted on the tiller
  • slide the boomkin in place through the transom and lock in place with the pin in the mounting block on top of the day storage box
  • slide the gooseneck of the mizzen boom down the track on the aft side of of the mizzen mast, rest the mizzen boom on shoulder while unclipping the lower portion of the lazy jacks and clipping them, port and starboard, to the upper portion of the lazy jacks hanging down from the top of the mizzen mast
  • untie the mizzen sheet from underneath the mizzen boom, feed it through the block at the after end of the boomkin, up through the block hanging down from the mizzen boom and through the fairlead to the cam cleat on the transom deck
a sparking day on the water
  • tie a figure eight knot in the end of the mizzen sheet forward of the cam cleat
  • attach the halyard to the head of the mizzen sail, tie the three sail ties to the luff
  • remove the mizzen sail cover
  • pick up the main mast, with all lines attached, and step through the hole the foredeck into the main mast step below
  • undo the first wrap of the 1/8 inch blue line that holds all the main mast lines, releasing the shrouds and forestay
a halo around the sun as ice crystals in a cool front, the same front that pushed away the hurricane, catch the light
  • grab the small wrench and cut-off screw driver from the day storage box.
  • attach the shrouds, already measured out, to the tangs port and starboard
  • use the screw driver and wrench to loosen the turnbuckle on the forestay, attached the forestay to the fairlead at the forward end of the bow sprit, then tighten until the forestay makes a nice "twanging" sound
  • use the wrench to lock the turnbuckle in place
  • pick up the forward end of the main boom, with sail and gaff attached, all wrapped in the sailcover and lower portions of the lazy jacks, and slide the gooseneck down the tracks on the aft side of the main mast
this boat circled Spartina taking photographs, the guy laughed and yell "NO FAIR!!" when I pulled out my camera
  • free the rest of the lines, still held by the blue line, from the main mast
  • raise the topping lift to get the main mast up about four feet, snugging in place by pulling the main sheet taught
  • unwrap the lower portions of the main lazy jacks from the main boom and connect to the upper portions hanging down from the mast
  • pull back the main sail cover, loose the 3/4 inch line wrapped around the main and tie the three lines that attach the mainsail to the mast plus the line attached to the jaws
  • walk aft to pull taught and cleat the main sail outhaul
dolphins on Crawford Bay in front of the old Naval Hospital that dates to 1823
  • while walking forward stop at the centerboard trunk and take two 1/2 turns on the cb winch raising the cb out of the trailering harness
  • continue forward and feed the main downhaul through the fairlead on the deck and tie off to the 4 inch line cleat
  • grab the halyards and attach to the gaff at the peak and throat positions using the bronze clips
  • hook the jib halyard up forward on the deck cleat
  • hop out of the boat, grab the jib in the bag
blue skies and white clouds, the seasons are changing
  • clip the jib to the bow sprit and hank on the sail, clipping the halyard to the sail head
  • feed the jib sheets through the fairleads, port and starboard, and lead them through the cam cleats with a figure eight know at the end of each
  • use the blue line, the same one that held the lines to the mast, to tie the jib to the bow sprit
  • put the mainsail covers, dummy mast, jib bag in the jeep
  • check the fuel level in the outboard
  • unclip the safety chain on the bow ring
  • launch the boat and have a nice day on the water
pomegranate fresh from the backyard

Wow, that sounds like a lot of work. How long does it take? About 35 or 40 minutes. If I have help, it takes an hour or more (it's easier to do it by myself). I kind of enjoy rigging the boat. I watch the tugboats working out on the river, I listen to the seagulls above. It's kind of nice.
Wind was decent in the morning, better than expected. It fell off in the afternoon so I tied up at the waterfront got a sandwich and a newspaper and relaxed out on Crawford Bay.


Jerked chicken with mango/pomegranate/avacado salsa for dinner. A very nice day.

steve

5 comments:

Brian said...

Hi. Can you post pics of your centreboard harness please. Cheers Brian

Steve said...

No need for a photo (and maybe harness was too big a word). It is just some leftover amsteel (3/8 or 1/2 inch diameter) looped back and forth from one side of the trailer to the other three times towards the aft end of the cb trunk. The amsteel has a breaking strength of 2000 or 3000 pounds. I just slack the line that is used to raise the 100 pound cb so it rests on the amsteel and all the stress of bouncing up and down on the highway goes there instead of on the cb trunk. steve

Jim Vibert said...

Thanks for the launch routine recap. It would be fun to see your connection points for all your sheets, halyards, etc. From some of you pictures it appears you are big on carabiners. Do you also use sister clips?

Steve said...

I'm not sure what a sister clip is so I guess the answer is no. To attach the halyards to the sails I use what I I think are called rigid bronze round eye snaps.
For the main sheet I use a couple of stainless steel carabiners to hang the blocks under the boom. (When I put up the boom tent I need to remove the mainsheet and with the carabiners the sheets come off/go back on quickly and easily.)
Both attachments seem to work and they were affordable.

steve

Jim Vibert said...

Sister Clips: http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=8571&familyName=Stainless+Steel+Sister+Clips
We used these during my racing days. Very light and easily clipped on and off. Mainly spinnakers but they have many uses. You might look into them sometime.